What's on TV/Netflix/Amazon Thread

Joecity

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Looking forward to this. About life in London late 70s early 80s leading up to the Brixton Riots. Based on closing ranks the autobiography of Leroy Logan who was the first black superintendent of the met. He’s played by John Boyega in this. It’s not all about him though he comes in later.

I think they tell his Dads story as well who was very badly beaten by the Police and received a pay out. Directed by Steve McQueen 12 years a slave. Should be good.


 

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Agreed with all this. Never expected myself to be laughing out loud at a serial killer's responses.

How good is David Tenant in it?! The stutters, calm answers and the empty stare. Brilliant.

Final episode tonight.
People have been moaning about all the smoking in it.

 

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Agreed with all this. Never expected myself to be laughing out loud at a serial killer's responses.

How good is David Tenant in it?! The stutters, calm answers and the empty stare. Brilliant.

Final episode tonight.
Will give tgis a go, is it in catch up? Or iplayer? Loves a bit of tenant, need to finish off tgat series with him and brian clough as demons
 

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Will give tgis a go, is it in catch up? Or iplayer? Loves a bit of tenant, need to finish off tgat series with him and brian clough as demons
ITV catch up :thumbup:
 

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Sorry if it's been mentioned but 'The Fall' on Netflix is quite good my butties:thumbup:
 

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Will give tgis a go, is it in catch up? Or iplayer? Loves a bit of tenant, need to finish off tgat series with him and brian clough as demons
I'm watching it now. It's good stuff and Tennant is excellent again
 

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Currently watching this in Netflix, very good but quite shocking to see the level of institutional racism that was occurring in my lifetime, and also sad to see that it hasn’t improved that much

 

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Just watched a little 40 min documentary on speed cubers. Severely autistic kid whos world champion can do the Rubik’s cube in about 6 seconds. Quite a heart warming little documentary seeing how it’s helped him make friends.
 

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Just watched The Australian Dream documentary on i Player.
It's about an indigenous Aussie rules player who got a 13 yo girl kicked out of a ground for calling him an "ape" and the backlash that HE suffered as a result.
Really well made and thought provoking.
 

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Just watched The Australian Dream documentary on i Player.
It's about an indigenous Aussie rules player who got a 13 yo girl kicked out of a ground for calling him an "ape" and the backlash that HE suffered as a result.
Really well made and thought provoking.
Great programme but quite depressing. Racism seems quite ingrained in Australia
 

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Great programme but quite depressing. Racism seems quite ingrained in Australia
And absolutely disgusting how the Brits claimed to have discovered the place, despite being inhabited for some 63,000 years by the Aborigines.

Used some typically lame Latin phrase to say it hadn't been 'civilised' so was therefore theirs.

Has happened the world over unfortunately.
 

Eat Y'self Fitter

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Extraction (Netflix). Thor from The Avengers turns Australian and then flies into Bangladesh where he goes all Jack Bauer in an attempt to rescue the kidnapped son of an imprisoned gangster. Doesn't go according to plan.

2nd rate thriller that I was happy to watch on a Saturday night but would've been annoyed if I'd driven to Whitchurch Blockbusters to rent.
 

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Cobra Kai at the moment.

Just finished the latest season of Succession Succession (TV Series 2018– ) - IMDb - https://www.imdb.com/title/tt7660850/ but it's not on Netflix or Amazon yet.
Succession: What's the big deal about the Emmy-winning drama?


HBO drama Succession won big at this year's Primetime Emmys, picking up prizes for acting, writing, directing and best drama. What's the secret of its success?

After the hugely successful Game of Thrones concluded last year, Emmy voters knew they had to do some Succession planning.

HBO's fantasy series had dominated the ceremony for some time, winning the night's top prize - best drama series - in four out of the last five years.

But after its final season in 2019, something had to take its place on TV's biggest night of the year. And Succession has been patiently waiting in the wings for its moment in the spotlight - just like some of its characters.

The US series follows Logan Roy (played by Brian Cox), the ageing CEO of a huge media and entertainment company, and his four children - three of whom are desperate to be named his successor.

For a show that inspires such a dedicated following, however, there's something rather unusual about it: you won't like any of the characters.

"I hate everyone on Succession and I can't stop watching," wrote Elle's EJ Dickson after it launched.

"Nothing happens and the characters are vile, but Succession is still the best thing on TV," agreed The Independent's Ed Cumming.

So why has it become so popular?

Firstly, if you're going to watch Succession, you need to adjust your brain slightly to its tone.

In the same way that you have to tune your ear to the Baltimore accents of The Wire, or get used to the sheer speed of dialogue in The West Wing, Succession has its own economy of style.

Its tone is unrelentingly cynical and sardonic, as the Roys constantly undermine and verbally abuse each other. The kids are entitled and cunning, as are many of their other halves, who are equally keen to join and ascend the company hierarchy.

Its dark sense of humour is part of its appeal in the woke landscape of entertainment, and the main characters are people you love to hate.

"Here's the thing about being rich: it's [expletive] great," explains Matthew Macfadyen's character Tom Wambsgans in one of the show's most famous speeches.

The characters don't particularly care about each other's feelings, or the well-being of the company's employees. Instead they focus their attention on money, their own careers, avoiding bad media coverage and passing the buck when something goes wrong.

Lives and careers are ruined amid a cut-throat environment, yet everything happens amid a sense of farce.

"Succession has the ability to combine wildly disparate elements without them ever undermining each other," wrote James Walton in The Spectator.

The Guardian's Tim Dowling said: "The writing is savage, the dialogue sharp and foul-mouthed. Although funny in places, it is also scary, as any drama peopled by monsters ought to be."

However, as Variety's Daniel D'Addario noted: "Its pulpy willingness to be its silliest self can be great fun, but can also transport a show that often tries to say something real about the hazards of generational wealth into too-easy comedy, or fantasy."

Is it based on the Murdochs?

Not officially.

Read any interview with the show's stars or creator Jesse Armstrong, and you'll find them acknowledging similarities but largely playing down this suggestion.

There are parallels, no doubt. Rupert Murdoch also owns a global media company - and has multiple children (particularly James, Elisabeth and Lachlan) who have each been tipped as his successor at one time or another.

But then there are several other families who have a similar dynamic.

"The amazing thing about this stuff is that it's everywhere," Armstrong told the New York Times last year. "Sumner Redstone's family. The Mercers. The Murdochs. Conrad Black.

"Sometimes people have said, 'It's really about these people, isn't it? It's based on them.' And: No. We read widely and we do take elements of stuff."

Few members of the Murdoch family have publicly commented on Succession, and James Murdoch says he has never seen it. However, Brian Cox recently recalled a chance encounter with a member of the family in London.

"I was in my favourite café in Primrose Hill," the actor told the Hollywood Reporter. "And this guy said 'We're really liking the show... but my wife finds it a little hard to watch sometimes.'"

Cox thanked him for the compliment but asked why his wife was less keen. The man replied: "Well, I'm married to Elisabeth Murdoch."

Why all the Emmys?

The Emmys have developed a reputation for rewarding the same shows year after year. Mad Men, Veep, Modern Family and 30 Rock are among shows which have dominated the top categories in the last couple of decades.

But the success of Schitt's Creek and Succession this year has freshened up the ceremony.

One major factor was the absence of Game of Thrones, which allowed Succession to step forward and pick up some of the major prizes.

It also feels like the Emmys are making up for lost time. The first series took home just one award, for writing, at last year's ceremony.

By the time the awards took place, the second season was already airing to huge critical acclaim. But it couldn't be nominated until this year, due to the eligibility window.

"The calendar just screws it up," explained Vanity Fair's Christopher Rosen. "The Emmys are playing catch-up here, to reward Succession for a second season which was airing during last year's Emmys."

In the meantime, Succession has been winning some major awards at other ceremonies - including January's Golden Globes, which saw Cox win best actor in a drama series.

All of which means the Emmys likely felt that some recognition for Succession was well overdue.
 

Eat Y'self Fitter

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Succession: What's the big deal about the Emmy-winning drama?


HBO drama Succession won big at this year's Primetime Emmys, picking up prizes for acting, writing, directing and best drama. What's the secret of its success?

After the hugely successful Game of Thrones concluded last year, Emmy voters knew they had to do some Succession planning.

HBO's fantasy series had dominated the ceremony for some time, winning the night's top prize - best drama series - in four out of the last five years.

But after its final season in 2019, something had to take its place on TV's biggest night of the year. And Succession has been patiently waiting in the wings for its moment in the spotlight - just like some of its characters.

The US series follows Logan Roy (played by Brian Cox), the ageing CEO of a huge media and entertainment company, and his four children - three of whom are desperate to be named his successor.

For a show that inspires such a dedicated following, however, there's something rather unusual about it: you won't like any of the characters.

"I hate everyone on Succession and I can't stop watching," wrote Elle's EJ Dickson after it launched.

"Nothing happens and the characters are vile, but Succession is still the best thing on TV," agreed The Independent's Ed Cumming.

So why has it become so popular?

Firstly, if you're going to watch Succession, you need to adjust your brain slightly to its tone.

In the same way that you have to tune your ear to the Baltimore accents of The Wire, or get used to the sheer speed of dialogue in The West Wing, Succession has its own economy of style.

Its tone is unrelentingly cynical and sardonic, as the Roys constantly undermine and verbally abuse each other. The kids are entitled and cunning, as are many of their other halves, who are equally keen to join and ascend the company hierarchy.

Its dark sense of humour is part of its appeal in the woke landscape of entertainment, and the main characters are people you love to hate.

"Here's the thing about being rich: it's [expletive] great," explains Matthew Macfadyen's character Tom Wambsgans in one of the show's most famous speeches.

The characters don't particularly care about each other's feelings, or the well-being of the company's employees. Instead they focus their attention on money, their own careers, avoiding bad media coverage and passing the buck when something goes wrong.

Lives and careers are ruined amid a cut-throat environment, yet everything happens amid a sense of farce.

"Succession has the ability to combine wildly disparate elements without them ever undermining each other," wrote James Walton in The Spectator.

The Guardian's Tim Dowling said: "The writing is savage, the dialogue sharp and foul-mouthed. Although funny in places, it is also scary, as any drama peopled by monsters ought to be."

However, as Variety's Daniel D'Addario noted: "Its pulpy willingness to be its silliest self can be great fun, but can also transport a show that often tries to say something real about the hazards of generational wealth into too-easy comedy, or fantasy."

Is it based on the Murdochs?

Not officially.

Read any interview with the show's stars or creator Jesse Armstrong, and you'll find them acknowledging similarities but largely playing down this suggestion.

There are parallels, no doubt. Rupert Murdoch also owns a global media company - and has multiple children (particularly James, Elisabeth and Lachlan) who have each been tipped as his successor at one time or another.

But then there are several other families who have a similar dynamic.

"The amazing thing about this stuff is that it's everywhere," Armstrong told the New York Times last year. "Sumner Redstone's family. The Mercers. The Murdochs. Conrad Black.

"Sometimes people have said, 'It's really about these people, isn't it? It's based on them.' And: No. We read widely and we do take elements of stuff."

Few members of the Murdoch family have publicly commented on Succession, and James Murdoch says he has never seen it. However, Brian Cox recently recalled a chance encounter with a member of the family in London.

"I was in my favourite café in Primrose Hill," the actor told the Hollywood Reporter. "And this guy said 'We're really liking the show... but my wife finds it a little hard to watch sometimes.'"

Cox thanked him for the compliment but asked why his wife was less keen. The man replied: "Well, I'm married to Elisabeth Murdoch."

Why all the Emmys?

The Emmys have developed a reputation for rewarding the same shows year after year. Mad Men, Veep, Modern Family and 30 Rock are among shows which have dominated the top categories in the last couple of decades.

But the success of Schitt's Creek and Succession this year has freshened up the ceremony.

One major factor was the absence of Game of Thrones, which allowed Succession to step forward and pick up some of the major prizes.

It also feels like the Emmys are making up for lost time. The first series took home just one award, for writing, at last year's ceremony.

By the time the awards took place, the second season was already airing to huge critical acclaim. But it couldn't be nominated until this year, due to the eligibility window.

"The calendar just screws it up," explained Vanity Fair's Christopher Rosen. "The Emmys are playing catch-up here, to reward Succession for a second season which was airing during last year's Emmys."

In the meantime, Succession has been winning some major awards at other ceremonies - including January's Golden Globes, which saw Cox win best actor in a drama series.

All of which means the Emmys likely felt that some recognition for Succession was well overdue.
Succession is amazing. It was discussed in the other thread that had to be moved VIP. Definitely worth putting in here too in case others missed it. It's back on Sky box sets too for those that have that kind of thing.

It's a damn shame the 3rd series has been delayed due to Covid..
 

Arfur Ap Llewellyn Europe

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Succession: What's the big deal about the Emmy-winning drama?


HBO drama Succession won big at this year's Primetime Emmys, picking up prizes for acting, writing, directing and best drama. What's the secret of its success?

After the hugely successful Game of Thrones concluded last year, Emmy voters knew they had to do some Succession planning.

HBO's fantasy series had dominated the ceremony for some time, winning the night's top prize - best drama series - in four out of the last five years.

But after its final season in 2019, something had to take its place on TV's biggest night of the year. And Succession has been patiently waiting in the wings for its moment in the spotlight - just like some of its characters.

The US series follows Logan Roy (played by Brian Cox), the ageing CEO of a huge media and entertainment company, and his four children - three of whom are desperate to be named his successor.

For a show that inspires such a dedicated following, however, there's something rather unusual about it: you won't like any of the characters.

"I hate everyone on Succession and I can't stop watching," wrote Elle's EJ Dickson after it launched.

"Nothing happens and the characters are vile, but Succession is still the best thing on TV," agreed The Independent's Ed Cumming.

So why has it become so popular?

Firstly, if you're going to watch Succession, you need to adjust your brain slightly to its tone.

In the same way that you have to tune your ear to the Baltimore accents of The Wire, or get used to the sheer speed of dialogue in The West Wing, Succession has its own economy of style.

Its tone is unrelentingly cynical and sardonic, as the Roys constantly undermine and verbally abuse each other. The kids are entitled and cunning, as are many of their other halves, who are equally keen to join and ascend the company hierarchy.

Its dark sense of humour is part of its appeal in the woke landscape of entertainment, and the main characters are people you love to hate.

"Here's the thing about being rich: it's [expletive] great," explains Matthew Macfadyen's character Tom Wambsgans in one of the show's most famous speeches.

The characters don't particularly care about each other's feelings, or the well-being of the company's employees. Instead they focus their attention on money, their own careers, avoiding bad media coverage and passing the buck when something goes wrong.

Lives and careers are ruined amid a cut-throat environment, yet everything happens amid a sense of farce.

"Succession has the ability to combine wildly disparate elements without them ever undermining each other," wrote James Walton in The Spectator.

The Guardian's Tim Dowling said: "The writing is savage, the dialogue sharp and foul-mouthed. Although funny in places, it is also scary, as any drama peopled by monsters ought to be."

However, as Variety's Daniel D'Addario noted: "Its pulpy willingness to be its silliest self can be great fun, but can also transport a show that often tries to say something real about the hazards of generational wealth into too-easy comedy, or fantasy."

Is it based on the Murdochs?

Not officially.

Read any interview with the show's stars or creator Jesse Armstrong, and you'll find them acknowledging similarities but largely playing down this suggestion.

There are parallels, no doubt. Rupert Murdoch also owns a global media company - and has multiple children (particularly James, Elisabeth and Lachlan) who have each been tipped as his successor at one time or another.

But then there are several other families who have a similar dynamic.

"The amazing thing about this stuff is that it's everywhere," Armstrong told the New York Times last year. "Sumner Redstone's family. The Mercers. The Murdochs. Conrad Black.

"Sometimes people have said, 'It's really about these people, isn't it? It's based on them.' And: No. We read widely and we do take elements of stuff."

Few members of the Murdoch family have publicly commented on Succession, and James Murdoch says he has never seen it. However, Brian Cox recently recalled a chance encounter with a member of the family in London.

"I was in my favourite café in Primrose Hill," the actor told the Hollywood Reporter. "And this guy said 'We're really liking the show... but my wife finds it a little hard to watch sometimes.'"

Cox thanked him for the compliment but asked why his wife was less keen. The man replied: "Well, I'm married to Elisabeth Murdoch."

Why all the Emmys?

The Emmys have developed a reputation for rewarding the same shows year after year. Mad Men, Veep, Modern Family and 30 Rock are among shows which have dominated the top categories in the last couple of decades.

But the success of Schitt's Creek and Succession this year has freshened up the ceremony.

One major factor was the absence of Game of Thrones, which allowed Succession to step forward and pick up some of the major prizes.

It also feels like the Emmys are making up for lost time. The first series took home just one award, for writing, at last year's ceremony.

By the time the awards took place, the second season was already airing to huge critical acclaim. But it couldn't be nominated until this year, due to the eligibility window.

"The calendar just screws it up," explained Vanity Fair's Christopher Rosen. "The Emmys are playing catch-up here, to reward Succession for a second season which was airing during last year's Emmys."

In the meantime, Succession has been winning some major awards at other ceremonies - including January's Golden Globes, which saw Cox win best actor in a drama series.

All of which means the Emmys likely felt that some recognition for Succession was well overdue.
This could've been written about the Tories:

"The characters don't particularly care about each other's feelings, or the well-being of the company's employees. Instead they focus their attention on money, their own careers, avoiding bad media coverage and passing the buck when something goes wrong.

Lives and careers are ruined amid a cut-throat environment, yet everything happens amid a sense of farce."
 

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Extraction (Netflix). Thor from The Avengers turns Australian and then flies into Bangladesh where he goes all Jack Bauer in an attempt to rescue the kidnapped son of an imprisoned gangster. Doesn't go according to plan.

2nd rate thriller that I was happy to watch on a Saturday night but would've been annoyed if I'd driven to Whitchurch Blockbusters to rent.
That is a perfect description of how I felt about this movie.

Incredible action choreography but has a certain lameness to it that I couldn't quite put my finger on. Enjoyed it and would recommend it, just not enthusiastically.
 

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